The Many Looks of the Little Green Heron ~ Caught on camera from around the Lowcountry!

I spend many hours out in the field studying bird behavior and photographing them for possible painting subjects. Some birds can be more challenging than others to photograph!

The little Green Heron is a relatively small heron, which for the most part is very skittish and likes to hide along riverbanks or in bushes or trees. It is naturally camouflaged, sporting brown and green feathers, which blend in nicely with its surroundings. It is also very quick and will take off in a flash if it detects unwanted activity in the area.

Being skittish, fast, and naturally camouflaged turns birding for Green Herons into a challenging sport.

The fact that the Green Heron is a master of many looks also makes him fun to photograph.

I ask myself, if I were to paint a Green Heron, how would I like to portray him? The Green Heron is full of personality. One could create a large body of work just painting the many looks of the Green Heron.

I have been fortunate to have had a number of opportunities to zero in on the elusive little heron. I have a wide variety of images to choose from ranging from serious stalking-like poses to almost comical or amusing poses. I thought it might be interesting to show you some of the many looks of the Green Heron from images I’ve taken over the last couple of years around the Lowcountry.

My most recent sighting was in Mount Pleasant at a pond in the community of Charleston National. I came across a rookery where Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets were nesting. While photographing them I noticed a lot of activity from a pair of Green Herons in a bushy area near the water. Turned out the pair had four juveniles they were tending to.

The juvies had what looked like hair plugs on top of their heads (down feathers), where the adult head feathers will soon fill in. They were full of themselves, sometimes gathering 3 or 4 on a branch, waiting impatiently for Mom and Dad to come back with dinner.

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They let me get fairly close over time, as I returned four or five times to photograph them. It was the first time I’ve ever seen more than a pair together.

One of my favorite Green Herons was a bird I photographed in Huntington Beach State Park. It flew up onto the railing of a boardwalk over the marsh and put on quite a performance. He busted a move, he gave me his roadrunner-look with the spiked hairdo, and strutted his stuff like he was John Travolta in Saturday Night Fever! He stuck his neck out when I was leaving to say goodbye. :-)

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I was walking Folly Beach one morning and had my first sighting of a Green Heron at the beach. He was off in the distance perched on top of a gnarly old dead tree. He had a primo view!

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One of the funniest poses I’ve ever seen a Green Heron make was right here in Carolina Park, Mount Pleasant, SC, where we live. Again, this one was stationed on a bare branch of a dead tree. His pose was cartoonish and made me laugh. :-)

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The most camouflaged Green Heron I’ve seen was at the Audubon Swamp in Magnolia Gardens, Charleston, SC. Bright green duckweed was all around covering the surface of the water, fallen trees rotting in the swamp. There he was, creeping along, looking for his next meal.

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One of my favorite birding locations is the Pitt Street Bridge, in Mount Pleasant, SC, because of the wide variety of birds that you can see on any given day. I like this shot of my Pitt Street Bridge Green Heron because it’s so colorful and the strong reflections of the broken reeds.

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I was just down in Kiawah and spotted this Green Heron along the edge of a creek. He had his head feathers flared and had just been flirting with his partner who happened to be hiding in the bushes on the other side of the creek.

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Here are a few other pics I’ve taken of this spunky little heron.

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I’m working on a portrait of a Great Egret at the moment, but I’m looking forward to painting the Green Heron sometime soon. I’m not sure yet how I will choose to portray him, but I’ve got some good ideas now.


One of the joys of being an artist is having the freedom to follow my passion….
— William R. Beebe
What’s next?  Drawing by William R. Beebe

What’s next?

Drawing by William R. Beebe

My Guided Tour of Kiawah’s Birding Hotspots ~ A Three Hour Tour!

Unlike Gilligan’s Island, I wouldn’t mind being stranded on Kiawah Island. Yesterday morning I had the good fortune of having a three-hour guided tour of all the best birding spots in Kiawah. We didn’t go by boat. I was picked up by car at 6:15 am by a good friend and former Board Member of the Kiawah Conservancy (Allan Stewart), in order to be on the island for our tour departure time of 7:30 am. We arrived right on the dot!

Within seconds our guide met us in the driveway. Bob Hill is a long time friend of Allan’s and has become a serious birder, having traveled around the world photographing birds. He was prepared with bug spray to fend off the biting flies and the mosquitoes. He had water and Gatorade for us in the car. He had preplanned our excursion around the island to all of his favorite birding locations. This was an extraordinarily generous gesture from one birder to another. Many photographers do not want to disclose their favorite locations because of their competitive nature in getting the best shot.

Off we drove down streets lined with big oaks and palms. Magnificent homes with stunning architecture are all tucked back into the flora, blending in with the natural surroundings as planned out by the developer. One doesn’t get the feel that he/she is driving through residential neighborhoods, but rather through a nature’s paradise.

As we rounded a bend water was off to our right and I spotted dozens of birds all actively feeding in what appeared to be a large salt marsh. A photographer was already there with his giant zoom lens and tripod capturing the spectacle. Bob’s first stop on our tour turned out to be a sight I will always remember.

Great Egrets, Snowy Egrets, Little Blue Herons, Great Blue Herons, Cormorants, Black-skimmers, and I’m sure a few other species, were all actively feeding in the marshy pond. There were so many birds to focus on, some flying fast and others posing that it became a challenge to have my settings right. There was also strong backlighting, so choosing the right angle to shoot in relation to the sun was another consideration to factor in on each pic. I was torn between species! All the birds wanted my attention and I couldn’t give it to them! :-) Very stressful!

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Great White Egret

Great White Egret

Black Skimmer

Black Skimmer

Snowy Egret

Snowy Egret

I reluctantly got in the car, for this wasn’t our only stop and I could have stayed there all day. We had so much more to see. Next stop was by the Ocean Course along the beach (famous for hosting the Ryder Cup in 1991 and the PGA Championship in 2012). For this golfer, it was a treat to walk past the Ocean Course clubhouse, by the driving range and practice putting green. I was dressed more like a golfer because we had plans to go out to lunch afterwards and a collared shirt was required.

One of the birds I wanted to see most was a Black-necked Stilt. As we were walking down to the beach past the putting green I spotted one! It was all by itself in a shallow pool in the sand. I was too far away for a good shot at it, so like a rookie birder I took off on the run in order to get close before it flew away. As I was about to stop running and take a pic the lone Black-necked Stilt took off!!! Sorry, no picture. :-(

I did manage to get a few good shots of a Tricolored Heron, also known as a Louisiana Heron. It was actively feeding, acting almost like a Reddish Egret, chasing down small fish in a bit of a frenzy.

Tricolored Heron

Tricolored Heron

We moved on to a number of Bob’s other favorite birding locations. As the morning became progressively hotter the birds became less active and less visible. At one location, which happened to be where my brother and his wife were recently married, we spotted a pair of Green Herons along a small river/stream. I took this picture of the male Green Heron showing off his head feathers and strutting his stuff along the bank of the stream.

Little Green Heron

Little Green Heron

We heard the distinctive call of the Osprey up high in the trees as we were driving along. Bob pulled over and we all admired and photographed a handsome bird as he proceeded to tear into his morning catch.

Osprey

Osprey

A Bluebird posed for us in Bluebird Meadow.

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A Snowy stood atop a craggily dead tree.

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And of course gators lurked everywhere!

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Thank you to Bob Hill of Kiawah Island for being so generous with his time and for disclosing all of his favorite birding spots to me. Thank you to Allan for introducing us and for suggesting that we meet up and experience Kiawah together.I enjoyed our three-hour tour thoroughly!!!


One of the joys of being an artist is having the freedom to follow my passion….
— William R. Beebe
What’s next?  Drawing by William R. Beebe

What’s next?

Drawing by William R. Beebe

Painting Iconic Rainbow Row ~ focusing on the charming elements!

I can hear gallery owners saying, “Everybody paints Rainbow Row”. That may be true, but I like to think that beautiful scenery can be interpreted in many ways. Rainbow Row is iconic in that almost everyone who visits Charleston wants to walk along the colorful stretch of East Bay, and or have their picture taken in front of it. Artists like to paint it because it is so charming.

I’ve painted Rainbow Row now three times. Downtown World was my first painting. It is a large piece and leads the viewer down the long sidewalk in front of the colorful row homes. My second painting of Rainbow Row is called Colors of the Rainbow and focuses on some of the rooftops. My latest painting entitled Charming Rainbow Row focuses on an inviting section of the famous iconic home fronts.

Charming Rainbow Row    by William R. Beebe, 12 x 12, Oil on board, $2200

Charming Rainbow Row by William R. Beebe, 12 x 12, Oil on board, $2200

With this painting I wanted to feature some of the many charming elements that make the colorful buildings so impressive and extraordinary. Window boxes overflowing with flowers and greenery, potted plants lining the sidewalk, historic wooden shutters with their old fashioned ties, decorative lanterns over doorways, and of course wrought-iron gates all bring passerbys to a standstill. They are what take the colorful row homes to the next level.

Charming is one of the most used adjectives when describing downtown Charleston. Architectural elements are a big reason why.

I love the old-fashioned park bench that invites strangers to sit and relax in front of the private residence. With colorful window boxes on either side the sitter feels like they are sitting in a park or garden, not along a busy road.

Charming Rainbow Row   bench detail by William R. Beebe

Charming Rainbow Row bench detail by William R. Beebe

Gas lit lanterns are common in Historic Charleston. It is a charming element that many of the newer homes are featuring.

Arched entryways with wrought-iron gates add decorative curves to all of the verticals and horizontals in traditional architecture.

Charming Rainbow Row   lantern and arch details by William R. Beebe

Charming Rainbow Row lantern and arch details by William R. Beebe

Seeing the way the light filtered through the canopy of trees lining the sidewalk highlighting colors and objects, was what inspired me to paint Rainbow Row once again.

I hope you like my painting Charming Rainbow Row and find that it makes you want to park yourself on the bench or take a picture. I always enjoy walking past this location and almost always take a picture. Thank you for reading my journal and for your interest in my art! It is most appreciated.

Please check back soon to see what’s next on the easel.


One of the joys of being an artist is having the freedom to follow my passion...
— William R. Beebe
What’s next?  Drawing by William R. Beebe

What’s next?

Drawing by William R. Beebe

Along Meeting Street ~ Colorful Impressions!

There are many locations in downtown Charleston that I return to when seeking inspiration for my art. One of those locations is a stretch along Meeting Street. When the light is right my attention is diverted in many directions, always wanting to take it all in.

Streaks of light cross the street and bounce off the sides of colorful homes, caused by the canopy of tree tops that cover the street. Strong shadows play tricks on the eyes changing bold colors to neutralized or cooler colors.

My painting entitled 43 Meeting Street was about recording an historic home accurately. When I went back to 43 Meeting Street and viewed it from another angle I saw everything differently. It wasn’t all about the yellow house this time.

It was as if I was looking into an Impressionist painting; splashes of red and white flowers popping out of greenery, lavender shadows, Cerulean blue highlights reflecting off objects, and an overall sense of light!

So it was with all of that in mind, I set out to paint Along Meeting Street in the spirit of a plein air painter, pretending I was working on location with my French easel. My mission was to keep it painterly. Don’t be afraid of color. Let the light shine through. Have fun with it.

Along Meeting Street    by William R. Beebe, 12 x 12, Oil on board, $2200

Along Meeting Street by William R. Beebe, 12 x 12, Oil on board, $2200

When I found myself putting more detail in than necessary I would reverse it and deconstruct it. I used brushes without fine tips to keep from producing sharp edges. One of my favorite things about painting is “letting the paint surprise you”.

It doesn’t happen all that often when painting in a realistic style. It can, but I find it happens much more often when I’m trying to create an impression.

I hope you like Along Meeting Street. The yellow house is one of Charleston’s many historic single houses with the unique side porch. This stretch of Meeting Street is one I always enjoy walking on a nice sunny day. Charleston is a great walking city with scenes like this throughout.

Thank you for reading my journal and for your interest in my art! I will be starting several other Charleston scenes soon, working in the same manner, so please check back soon to see what’s on the easel!


One of the joys of being an artist is having the freedom to follow my passion...
— William R. Beebe
What’s next?  Drawing by William R. Beebe

What’s next?

Drawing by William R. Beebe