Before painting in oil ~ I dabbled in ink!

Pen and ink was always a scary medium to work with.  The permanence of each stroke puts a lot of pressure on an artist to get it right the first time.  For that reason I shied away from using it.  
    
Recently, I came across a pen and ink drawing I did over thirty-five years ago!  I copied one of Winslow Homer’s paintings entitled Boys in a Pasture.  

Boys in a Pasture by William R. Beebe, pen and ink, 1980

Boys in a Pasture by William R. Beebe, pen and ink, 1980

Before I started painting for a living I used to draw in pencil, dabble in watercolor, and dabble in pen and ink.  I occasionally would copy well-known works by some of the greats just for practice.

So, I thought I’d share with all of you one of my very early works, dated 1980.  I didn’t start taking art seriously until 1990, so at the time I was just doing it for practice.  

On a smooth Bristol paper I made a very light pencil sketch first before breaking out the ink pen.  I used an old-fashioned fountain pen with India ink.  The shaded-in areas were watercolor washes of varying shades of gray.   

But oil paint is the medium I’ve always loved to use, ever since my very first painting class in college.  I’m presently working on several small maritime paintings after finishing up a large commission piece.  

I hope you enjoyed seeing my version of Homer’s, Boys in a Pasture.  It is a nostalgic scene of innocence from 19th Century rural America.  To this day I appreciate Homer’s work, especially his strong marine paintings.  When we lived in Maine we went to visit his home and studio in Prouts Neck, an area known for its coastline and exceptional light.  Much of Homer’s later work was from that very location.  

Boys in a Pasture by Winslow Homer, 1874

Boys in a Pasture by Winslow Homer, 1874

Thank you as always for your interest in my art and journal!  I appreciate hearing from all of you when you have questions or comments! Thanks.


One of the joys of being an artist is having the freedom to follow my passion...
— William R. Beebe
What's next? Drawing by William R. Beebe

What's next?

Drawing by William R. Beebe