Pelicans in the Sky ~ the art of “formations”!

As I was looking back through my photographs of Brown Pelicans, picking out what to paint next, I was taken with the many different formations the Brown Pelicans form when flying.  I find the formations curiously interesting, artistically speaking.  Suddenly, I had a vision: big art for big walls for beach homes!

If I lived at the beach I would love to have some huge paintings of Pelican formations.  It would make me feel like I was outside.  

I’m not saying I’m going to do it, but I have to say I think I would enjoy painting large Pelican formation paintings.  Some artist must already be doing it?    

I’m not talking extremely large paintings like Frederick Edwin Church and Thomas Cole’s landscape paintings, but sizeable, impressive works that become conversation pieces.  

Anyway, that gives you a little insight into how this artist’s mind works.  I’m always thinking of what I want to paint next, what would be fun or challenging to paint, and what would be creative and different.  

I thought I’d share some of my “formation” photographs with you.  There are many more, but this gives you an idea of what I’m talking about.   

Photograph-2-by-William-R-Beebe.jpg

The left side of my brain tells me to be a little more practical.  Large paintings are very time consuming.   Therefore, the price tag would be higher and the market niche would be much smaller.  Shipping and handling large paintings is never easy.  The cost to frame large works of art becomes more money out of pocket with no guarantees of recouping the cost any time soon.  

Then the right side of my brain says, “Paint them!”  

For now, I think I’ll continue to be practical and work on a smaller scale.  Hopefully, there will be time to tackle larger works down the road.  

Thanks as always for continuing to follow my art, my photography, and my journal. 


One of the joys of being an artist is having the freedom to follow my passion...
— William R. Beebe
What's next? Drawing by William R. Beebe

What's next?

Drawing by William R. Beebe